Unit Information Management System

Music, Aesthetics and Criticism (MUSC3333, SEM-1, 2014, Crawley)



Faculty of Arts


Conservatorium of Music




Unit Outline




Music, Aesthetics and Criticism


MUSC3333


SEM-1, 2014


Campus: Crawley


Unit Coordinator: Mr Ashley Smith


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© The University of Western Australia 2001



Unit details

Unit title Music, Aesthetics and Criticism
Unit code MUSC3333 Credit points 6
Availability SEM-1, 2014 (24/02/2014 - 21/06/2014)
Location Crawley Mode Face to face

Contact details

Faculty Faculty of Arts
School Conservatorium of Music
School website http://www.music.uwa.edu.au/
Unit coordinator Mr Ashley Smith
Email ashley.smith@uwa.edu.au
Consultation hours Consultation Hours for Ashley Smith: Tuesday 9-11am, Room 1.14, School of Music. Please make an appointment via ashley.smith@uwa.edu.au.
Lecturers
Ashley W SmithAssistant Professorashley.smith@uwa.edu.au08 6488 2042
Tutors/ Demonstrators/ Facilitators
Unit contact hours

Lectures: 2 hrs per week; field work: 1 day. Physical attendance and participation at all lecture/seminars is required in order to fulfil participation component of assessment.

Online handbook http://handbooks.uwa.edu.au/units/unitdetails?code=MUSC3333
Unit website

Unit rules

Prerequisites any Level 2 Music unit
Corequisites
Advisable prior study
Incompatibility
Approved quota

Unit description

This unit introduces students to the history of aesthetics and analytical techniques primarily, although not exclusively, relating to Western art music. It investigates the role of art theory (aesthetics) in music, its historical development, and place within contemporary intellectual culture. Central questions in the unit relate to musical meaning, the creation of aesthetic value and how such questions inform the emerging discipline of critical musicology. What are the key themes and theories of aesthetics and criticism in general, and in music in particular? What is the relationship between music and the listener in various historical, social and cultural contexts? By addressing these and other questions, the unit develops an advanced level of knowledge and critical thinking about music and music performance. This is an elective unit in the Music Studies major in the Bachelor of Arts degree. It is also open to students enrolled in other majors and degree pathways who fulfill the prerequisites and who have an interest in music.

Learning outcomes

Students are able to (1) outline significant developments and moments relating to the study of aesthetics in general and, more specifically, to Western art music and other related fields (e.g. ethnomusicology and popular music studies); (2) demonstrate a theoretical knowledge of the emerging field of critical musicology; (3) situate debates pertaining to music aesthetics and music criticism within wider historical, social and cultural contexts; (4) critically engage with performances of music as they relate to various historical periods; and (5) apply theoretical knowledge to research, plan and write a research essay.

Unit structure

This unit consists of 10 x 2 hour lecture/seminars and field work involving the attendance at one of five concerts (details of concerts are outlined in the section "assessment - critical analysis of a musical performance").

(See Timetable)

Unit schedule

WeekDateSeminar TopicLecturerAssessments Due
127th FebruaryAesthetic Value and JudgementAWS
26th MarchHistorical Survey I: The 18th and 19th Centuries - Music Aesthetics in the Context of the Enlightenment and RomanticismAWS
313th MarchHistorical Survey II: The 20th Century - The Rise of Modernism and the Disintegration of Aesthetic ThoughtAWS
420th MarchThe Concept of Music I: From Sounds, to Tone, to MeaningAWS
527th MarchThe Concept of Music II: Time, Rhythm and MovementAWS
63rd AprilDescribing the Aesthetic of Music - Capturing the Nature of MusicAWS
710th AprilNO SEMINAR/LECTURE:
Individual essay and critical analysis consultations by appointment.
AWS
817th AprilThe Aesthetics of PerformanceAWS
NON-TEACHING STUDY BREAKNO LECTURE/SEMINAR
91st MayCase Study I: Challenges to Aesthetics - Improvisation, Conceptual and Generative MusicAWSCritical Analysis Due
Thursday May 1st, 3pm.
108th MayCase Study II: Was Handel Gay? Sexuality, Gender and Autobiography in AestheticsAWS
11 PRODUCTION WEEKNO SEMINAR/LECTURE
1222nd MayCase Study III: The Music of Magnus Lindberg - Aesthetic Consistency Across Stylistic ChangeAWS
13NO LECTURE/SEMINAR:
Individual essay consultations by appointment
Critical Review Essay Due, Monday June 2nd, 3pm

Teaching and learning responsibilities

Teaching and learning strategies

Charter of student rights and responsibilities

The Charter of Student Rights and Responsibilities upholds the fundamental rights of students who undertake their education at The

University of Western Australia.

The University's Charter of Student Rights and Responsibilities is available at
http://www.governance.uwa.edu.au/procedures/policies/policies-and-procedures?method=document&id=UP07/132

Student Guild contact details

Contact details for the University Student Guild can be found at http://www.guild.uwa.edu.au/welcome/contact

           

Uses of student feedback

ACE/AISE/CARS

ACE / CARS / ISE

Academic Conduct Essentials (AACE1000/AACE7000)
Academic Conduct Essentials (ACE) is a compulsory online module for all students about ethical scholarship and the expectations of correct academic conduct that UWA has of its students. All students at any level – undergraduate, postgraduate, onshore, offshore – who are enrolled into a UWA course, are required to complete an online module which introduces you to the basic issues of ethical scholarship and the expectations of correct academic conduct that UWA has of its students. The unit is called Academic Conduct Essentials, or ACE for short, and is available through the Learning Management System (LMS) using your Pheme account. Those students required to complete ACE are automatically enrolled in the unit. Information about ACE is available in the UWA Handbook.

Communication and Research Skills (CARS1000)
All commencing undergraduate students are required to complete CARS1000 within the first 10 weeks of their first semester. CARS1000 is an online, self-paced unit that provides an introduction to the skills needed to find and use information effectively and efficiently, to communicate effectively and to work in teams. Topics covered include how to locate and use library resources, the search process and search strategies, how and why to reference work, evaluating online sources, writing, presenting and working in teams. CARS1000 is a Moodle unit containing several modules. In order to pass the unit, the unit quiz must be completed with a mark of 80% or greater. Multiple attempts at the quiz are allowed. Completion of the unit will be recorded as an Ungraded Pass (UP) or Ungraded Fail (UF) on your academic record. Students can only access this unit via the Learning Management System (LMS).

Indigenous Studies Essentials (INDG1000)
This unit is a Welcome to Country that introduces students to the shared learning space at The University of Western Australia. This learning space includes both Western and Indigenous knowledge systems. The unit looks at the local, national and global contexts of Indigenous peoples. Students consider where The University is located and share in the Noongar story of the place. They explore Aboriginal people in a national context and Indigenous people globally. Students are introduced to a range of protocols relevant to their professional and disciplinary contexts. This comprises an online quiz (100 per cent). A database of questions addresses all sections of the module. Students are permitted to attempt the quiz as often as they wish to achieve the required 80 per cent pass mark. This unit is a mandatory and informational unit. Students can access this unit via the Learning Management System (LMS).

Information for students with disabilities

The University has a range of support services, equipment and facilities for students with a disability. If you would like to receive advice on these services please email uniline@uwa.edu.au or visit http://www.student.uwa.edu.au/life/health/uniaccess

 

Assessment

Assessment overview

Typically this unit is assessed in the following way(s): (1) lecture participation; (2) critical analysis of a music performance; and (3) a critical review essay. Further information is available in the unit outline.

Assessment mechanism

#ComponentWeightDue DateRelates To Outcomes
1Lecture/seminar attendance and participation15%Assessed at each seminar/lecture1,2,3 and 4
2Critical analysis of a musical performance35%Thursday 1st May, 2014. 3pm2 and 4
3Critical review essay50%Monday 2nd July 2014. 3pm1,2,3 and 5

Assessment items

Item TitleDescriptionSubmission Procedure for Assignments
Lecture/Seminar Participation (15%)• Physical attendance at lecture/seminars;
• Participation in discussion and evidence of familiarisation of topics and arguments presented in the weekly readings;
• Journal of weekly ‘active reading’ tasks, the requirements of which are outlined at the end of each lecture/seminar.
Citation of journal at lecture/seminars as required.
Critical Analysis of a Music Performance
1,500 words
(35%)
Critically analyse a musical performance in terms of how aesthetic principles apply to:
a) the presented musical works (i.e. provide a critical narrative on the compositions performed);
b) the artistic programming (the selection of works, and how they interrelate in a single concert program); and,
c) the performance (interpretation, presentation, skill etc.).

The critical analysis MUST be of one of the following performances, or (in exceptional circumstances only) a performance that has been approved by the Unit Co-ordinator.

The Australian String Quartet
Monday 10th March: Continuum
http://www.asq.com.au/whats-on/detail/continuum-perth/continuum

West Australian Symphony Orchestra
Friday March 28th or March 29th: Master 2 - Brahms Violin Concerto
http://tickets.waso.com.au/single/psDetail.aspx?psn=8260

Musica Viva Australia:
Tuesday April 8th: Sitkovetsky Trio
http://www.musicaviva.com.au/whatson/international-concert-season-2014/musicians/sitkovetsky-trio

Tura New Music and Fremantle Arts Centre:
Thursday 10th April: Silver Swans – Ledger, Edwards and Tokin performed by Etica Ensemble.
http://fac.oztix.com.au/default.aspx?Event=41956

Australian Chamber Orchestra
Wednesday April 16th: Haydn and Italian Cello
https://www.aco.com.au/whats_on/event_detail/Sollima

Note: This is an academic critical analysis, NOT a commercial newspaper-style music criticism. Please use appropriate academic conventions and expression of academic writing. If students do not feel confident in their academic writing abilities, UWA offers many services including individual consultations to assist students to get feedback on their written work. See the STUDYSmarter website to book a consultation-http://www.student.uwa.edu.au/learning/studysmarter/writesmart/writesmart_drop-in
Submission deadline: 3pm, Thursday 1st May 2014.

All students must submit a hardcopy of the critical analysis via the UWA School of Music Assignment Box (located to the right of the School of Music Office on the first floor of the School of Music building).
Critical Review Essay
3,500 words
(50%)
“Musical aesthetics…is a metastudy. It does not analyse music, but asks what analysis could achieve; it does not evaluate music, but asks whether evaluation is possible; it does not explain the cognition of musical structures, but asks what we understand when we understand them as music… it describes the nature and limit of our thought about music.

Scruton, Roger, The Aesthetics of Music (New York: Oxford, 1997), p. 395.

Taking Scruton’s statement as a point of departure, create an original response to the question: what, if anything, can music aesthetics tell us about the nature of music?

As part of your argument, critically consider those aspects of philosophical thought that are relevant to the creative output of one composer.

Note 1. Please use appropriate academic conventions and expression of academic writing. If students do not feel confident in their academic writing abilities, UWA offers many services including individual consultations to assist students to get feedback on their written work. See the STUDYSmarter website to book a consultation: http://www.student.uwa.edu.au/learning/studysmarter/writesmart/writesmart_drop-in

Note 2. The essay must include a minimum of four references. In this instance, the term ‘references’ denotes reputable scholarly sources, for example, book, book chapters in edited volumes, peer-reviewed journal articles and lecture film documentaries. Unreliable online sources, such as Wikipedia or online dictionaries, are not reputable sources. ‘In-text’ references must be used to support or substantiate the general argument of the essay. Only list those sources in the ‘Reference List’ that have been cited in the essay.

Note 3. The essay must use ‘in-text’ referencing and include a reference list using the School of Music ‘Musicology’ referencing style. Full details of how to use this style are available at: http://guides.is.uwa.edu.au/friendly.php?s=musicology_referencing
Submission deadline: 3pm, Monday 2nd June 2014.

All students must submit a hardcopy of the critical review essay via the UWA School of Music Assignment Box (located to the right of the School of Music Office on the first floor of the School of Music building).


All students must submit a hardcopy of the critical analysis via the UWA School of Music Assignment Box (located to the right of the School of Music Office on the first floor of the School of Music building).

Academic literacy and academic misconduct

Plagiarism

Be aware that the work you submit must be your own with no unacknowledged debt to some other writer or source. To pass off written work as your own, whether you have copied it from someone else or from somewhere else (be it a published writer, another person, a TV program, a library anthology, a lecture, a website or whatever) is to deprive yourself of the real benefits of this unit and to be guilty of plagiarism. Plagiarism is a serious offence! University policy is that plagiarism, the unacknowledged quotation of material from other people's work, is a ground for failure. Moreover, your name is placed on a central plagiarism register. If you take notes from other sources (critical articles, background works, etc.) you must quote carefully and accurately, and acknowledge the quotation. Even if you paraphrase, you must still acknowledge that you are paraphrasing.

Please refer to the University's policy document for further information
http://www.arts.uwa.edu.au/students/policies/dishonesty

Appeals against academic assessment

In the first instance, students are strongly advised to talk informally to the lecturer about the grade awarded. The University provides the opportunity for students to lodge an appeal against any mark which he or she feels is unfair. Any student making an appeal is under an obligation to establish a prima facie case by providing particular and substantial reasons for the appeal. Students may wish to contact the Guild Education Officers to aid them in the appeals process. There is a 20 working day time limit for making any such appeal. An appeal against academic assessment may result, as appropriate, in an increase or decrease in the mark originally awarded.

The University regulations relating to appeals and the form on which the appeal should be lodged can be found at
http://www.student.uwa.edu.au/life/complaints

Textbooks and resources

Recommended texts

Lecture/Seminar Readings:

Each week key readings are set of the lecture. The material contained in the readings is then reviewed and shall form the basis for discussion. Additional readings shall be provided thoughout the course of the unit to assist students with formal coursework essays, as well as to gain a deeper understanding of the issues and topics raised.

YouTube clips will also supplement the lecture/seminar readings. Audio-visual materials will be made available via the LMS during the semester.

Week 1: Thursday, 27th February
Seminar 1: Aesthetic Value and Judgement

No readings.       

Week 2: Thursday, 6th March

Seminar 2: Historical Survey I: The 18th and 19th Centuries – Music Aesthetics in the Context of the Enlightenment and Romanticism
Bowie, Andrew, “Philosophy of music, III Aesthetics, 1750-2000”, Grove Music Online.
Edited by Deane Root. http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com
(Sections 1-7 only)

Hamilton, Andy,  Aesthetics and Music (London; New York: Continuum, 2007).
Chapter III: ‘The Aesthetics of Form, the Aesthetics of Expression and ‘Absolute Music’’’ (pp. 66-89)

Week 3: Thursday, 13th March
Seminar 3: Historical Survey II: The 20th Century - The Rise of Modernism and the Disintegration of Aesthetic Thought

Bowie, Andrew, “Philosophy of music  III Aesthetics, 1750-2000”, Grove Music Online.
Edited by Deane Root. http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com
(Sections 7-9 only)

Hamilton, Andy, Aesthetics and Music (London; New York: Continuum, 2007).
Chapter IX: ‘Adorno and Modernism” (pp. 153-171 only)

Week 4: Thursday, 20th March
Seminar 4: The Concept of Music I - From Sound, to Tone, to Meaning


Hamilton, Andy, Aesthetics and Music (London; New York: Continuum, 2007).
Chapter II: ‘The Concept of Music’ (pp. 40-62)

Scruton, Roger, The Aesthetics of Music (New York: Oxford, 1997).
Chapter I: ‘Sound’ (pp. 1-9 only)

Week 5: Thursday, 27th March
Seminar 5: The Concept of Music II - Time, Rhythm and Movement


Hamilton, Andy, Aesthetics and Music (London; New York: Continuum, 2007).
Chapter V: ‘Rhythm and Time” (pp. 119-148)

Scruton, Roger, The Aesthetics of Music (New York: Oxford, 1997).
Chapter II: ‘Tone’ (pp. 22-39 only)

Week 6: Thursday, 3rd April

Seminar 6: Describing the Aesthetics of Music  - Capturing the Nature of Music

Scruton, Roger, The Aesthetics of Music (New York: Oxford, 1997).
Chapter XIII: ‘Analysis’ (pp. 392-399 and 426-437 only)

Week 7: NO CLASS

No readings.

Week 8: Thursday, 17th April

Seminar 7: The Aesthetics of Performance

Cook, Nicholas, “Between Process and Product: Music and/as Performance.” Music Theory Online. Edited by Yonatan Malin
(Sections 1-31)

Scruton, Roger, The Aesthetics of Music (New York: Oxford, 1997).
Chapter IX: ‘Performance’ (pp. 438-456)

Week 9:  Thursday, May 1st

Seminar 8: Case Study I – Challenges to Aesthetics  - Improvisation, Generative and Conceptual Music

Hamilton, Andy,  Aesthetics and Music (London; New York: Continuum, 2007).
Chapter VII: ‘Improvisation and Composition” (pp. 192-215 only)

Bertinetto, Allessandro,Performing Imagination: The Aesthetics of Improvisation,” Klesis – Revue philosophique – 28; 2013.
Available at: <http://www.academia.edu/5583904/Performing_Imagination._The_Aesthetics_of_Improvisation>

Week 10: Thursday, 8th May

Seminar 9: Case Study II – Was Handel Gay? Sexuality, Gender and Autobiography in Aesthetics

Brett, Phillip, “Piano Four-hands: Schubert and the Performance of Gay Male Desire,” 19th Century Music 21:2 (1997), pp. 149-176

Maus, Fred, “What Was Critical Musicology”, Radical Musicology,http://www.radical-musicology.org.uk
Available at: http://www.radical-musicology.org.uk/special_critmus/maus.pdf

Week 11: PRODUCTION WEEK

No readings.

Week 12: Thursday 22nd May

Seminar 10: Case Study: Aesthetic Consistency Across Stylistic Change - the Music of Magnus Lindberg

Lindberg, Magnus: Clarinet Concerto
Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aj41GST5x_A

Lindberg, Magnus: Clarinet Quintet
Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sa-ZN1Ys5Cw

Week 13: NO CLASS

No readings.

Suggested alternate texts

Additional texts

Technical requirements

Software requirements

Additional resources and reading

Other important information

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS

The School of Music expects students to attend all lectures and (if applicable) workshops/tutorials for which they are enrolled. In all cases, students are required to remain for the full duration of each class. If a student is unable to attend a class, s/he must notify the unit lecturer/tutor (in writing) at least 24 hours in advance, with a medical certificate supporting any absence. Students with unsatisfactory attendance/participation may not have their work assessed and this will result in the award of a zero mark for the unit.


APPLYING FOR LEAVE

Students must seek permission from the Head of School before participating in external activities that are likely to prevent full attendance at classes and/or ensembles. In such cases, a leave of absence may be granted for certain external engagements or activities provided they are, in the School of Music’s view, likely to make a contribution to a student’s overall studies. The support of a student’s lecturer/tutor is required in all cases. Applications for a leave of absence must be submitted to the Head of School in writing. Application forms are available from the Administration Office or from www.music.uwa.edu.au/for/current_students. Non-compliance with these regulations may result in failing the unit in question or a penalty in the final assessment.


REFERENCING STYLE FOR WRITTEN WORK

For this unit, students can use either of the following referencing styles: Musicology / Ethnomusicology. A referencing and endnote guide for students can be found at the following web links:

Referencing guide for Musicology: http://libguides.library.uwa.edu.au/musicology_referencing

Endnote guide for Musicology: http://libguides.library.uwa.edu.au/content.php?pid=174262&sid=1841519

 

Referencing guide for Ethnomusicology: http://libguides.library.uwa.edu.au/ethnomusicology_referencing

Endnote guide for Ethnomusicology: http://libguides.library.uwa.edu.au/content.php?pid=174263&sid=1848561

 
If you are unsure as to which style is appropriate, please use the Musicology.
 
 

POLICY REGARDING SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENT

All written assessments are due by 3pm on the day of submission.

All written assessments must be accompanied by a School of Music Assignment Coversheet which can be downloaded and printed from the UWA School of Music website (http://www.music.uwa.edu.au).

All written assignments must be submitted via the Assignment Box outside the School of Music office, from where they will be registered with the date of submission. No faxed of emailed written assessments will be accepted.

 

POLICY REGARDING LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENT

Conditions For Late Submissions Accepted Without Penalty

The School of Music does not provide extensions for late submission of assessments. However, late submission of assessments may be accepted without penalty only if the student concerned has applied for Special Consideration. Appling for Special Consideration entails completing the application from, providing supporting documentation and submitting it to the Manager, Student Affairs in the FAHSS Student Office. The application form can be found at http://www.studentadmin.uwa.edu.au/welcome/forms

Note: Exemptions from penalty will only apply for those dates that are tabled in the documentary evidence. Note also that students should attempt to contact their unit coordinator as soon as practicable in the instance of illness or misadventure, and not wait until after the due date.

Conditions For late Submissions Accepted with Penalty

Late submission of assessments will be accepted up to five working days after the due date. Such submissions will accrue a penalty of 5-percentage points per day.

Conditions For Late Submissions Not Accepted

Assessments submitted later than five working days after the due date, without approved Special Consideration, will not be accepted under any circumstances. The School of Music reserves the right to refuse to accept submissions under these circumstances.


SCHOOL OF MUSIC MARKING CRITERIA (WRITTEN WORK)

High Distinction 1 (90%+)

  • The student shows an exceptional grasp of the issues, source material and theoretical framework/s.
  • The student demonstrates an exceptional level of originality, insight and critical synthesis.
  • The student shows an outstanding capacity for independent and original research.
  • The student demonstrates a sophisticated handling of evidence leading to compelling conclusions.
  • The student demonstrates outstanding academic writing skills, a persuasive use of language, and an extremely proficient level of written presentation that includes a clear structure.

High Distinction 2 (80-89%)

  • The student shows an excellent grasp of the issues, source material and theoretical framework/s.
  • The student demonstrates an excellent level of originality, insight and critical synthesis.
  • The student shows an admirable capacity for independent and original research.
  • The student demonstrates persuasive handling of evidence leading to convincing conclusions.
  • The student demonstrates a proficient level of written presentation.
  • The student demonstrates highly proficient academic writing skills, use of language, and written presentation that includes a clear structure.

Distinction (70-79%)

  • The student shows a convincing awareness of the main issues and their theoretical and/or practical implications.
  • The student shows evidence of originality, insight and critical synthesis.
  • The student shows a promising capacity for the independent handling of research findings.
  • The student presents a well organised, distinctive argument which demonstrates innovative thought.
  • The student demonstrates a very good standard of academic writing and written presentation, with a clear structure and correct referencing techniques, spelling, grammar and punctuation.

Credit (60-69%)

  • The student shows a creditable awareness of the main issues and their theoretical and/or practical implications.
  • The student shows competence in assimilating and synthesising a wide range of source material.
  • The student shows some capacity for the independent handling of research findings.
  • The student presents a coherent argument.
  • The student demonstrates a creditable standard of academic writing and written presentation, with a clear structure and correct referencing techniques, spelling, grammar and punctuation.

Pass (50-59%)

  • The student shows awareness of the main issues and their theoretical and/or practical implications.
  • The student shows familiarity with a satisfactory range of source material.
  • The student’s perspective is limited to conclusions reached in the existing literature.
  • The student presents an adequate argument.
  • The student demonstrates an acceptable standard of academic writing and written presentation in terms of structure, referencing techniques, spelling, grammar and punctuation.

Fail 1 (40-49%)

  • The student needs to develop greater awareness of the main issues and their theoretical and/or practical implications.
  • The student needs to develop greater familiarity with available source material.
  • The student needs to develop greater competence in synthesising ideas drawn from the literature.
  • The student needs to develop a more convincing argument.
  • The student needs to provide a higher standard of academic writing and written presentation with respect to referencing techniques, spelling, grammar and punctuation.

Fail 2 (0-39%)

The work does not meet the criteria listed for Fail 1.

 

Music Students' Society (MSS)

The Music Students' Society (MSS) is a UWA Faculty Society, affiliated with the UWA Guild, that represents students enrolled in units beginning with the unit code ‘MUSC’. Each year the MSS organizes social and educational student events to which all music students are invited to attend. Students can contact the MSS President via email at music@guild.uwa.edu.au